Reforming the GSEs and Injecting Private Actors into the Market

Guest Speakers

Ron Haynie,
Landon Parsons,
and James Glassman
on
“Reforming the GSEs and Injecting Private Actors into the Market”

Moderated by: Ike Brannon

Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Location:
Rayburn House Office Building, Room 2226

Featured Guests:

Ron Haynie is vice president of mortgage finance policy for the Independent Community Bankers of America® (ICBA). He provides leadership and guidance on all mortgage finance-related legislative and regulatory issues that impact community banks: government-sponsored enterprises, Federal Home Loan Banks, FHFA, HUD and mortgage rulemakings from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and other banking regulators.

Landon Parsons is an Advisor, Banker, and Investor with in-depth experience in specialty finance, asset-backed securities, asset-based lending, capital markets solutions, treasury management, mortgage-backed securities, and secured debt issuance. He is also an analyst, commentator, and published author on US housing policy and reform.

James Glassman is a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he works on Internet and communications policy in the new AEI Center for Internet, Communications, and Technology Policy. He was also the founding executive director of the George W. Bush Institute, a public policy development institution.

How Same Sex Marriage Affect Retirement Income and Government Budgets

Guest speakers

Stephen Rose
And
Karen E. Smith
on
“How Same Sex Marriage Affect Retirement Income and Government Budgets”

They will discuss their new paper on using DYNASIM to estimate the impact of legal same-sex marriage on retirement income and government budgets.

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Noon-1:00 p.m.

Location:
Tax Foundation
1350 G Street #950
Washington D.C.

Dr. Stephen J. Rose is a Research Professor at the George Washington Institute of Public Policy and a nationally-recognized labor economist who has been doing innovative research and writing about the interactions between formal education, training, career movements, incomes, and earnings for the last 35 years.

Karen Smith is a senior fellow in the Income and Benefits Policy Center at the Urban Institute, where she is an internationally recognized expert in microsimulation. Over the past 30 years, she has developed microsimulation models for evaluating Social Security, pensions, taxation, wealth and savings, labor supply, charitable giving, health expenditure, student aid, and welfare reform.

The Potential Impact of Mandated Employer Pension Programs on Retirement Savings

Guest speakers

Barbara Butrica 
And
Karen E. Smith

on

“The Potential Impact of Mandated Employer Pension Programs on Retirement Savings”

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Noon-1:00 p.m.

Barbara Butrica is a labor economist with expertise in aging and income dynamics. She studies issues related to the economic security of the baby boom generation, pensions, Social Security, and the engagement of older adults. Butrica has published her research in peer-reviewed journals and has written numerous research reports and briefs for general audiences.

Karen Smith is a senior fellow in the Income and Benefits Policy Center at the Urban Institute, where she is an internationally recognized expert in microsimulation. Over the past 30 years, she has developed microsimulation models for evaluating Social Security, pensions, taxation, wealth and savings, labor supply, charitable giving, health expenditure, student aid, and welfare reform.

Pension System Challenges Across the Globe

Guest speaker Pablo Antolín

on
“Pension System Challenges Across the Globe”

Monday, September 19
Noon – 1pm

Investment Company Institute
1401 H Steet, NW
Suite 1200
Washington, DC

Pablo Antolín is Principal Economist and Head of the Private Pension Unit of the OECD Financial Affairs Division.  He manages the research and policy program of the Working Party on Private Pension.  Mr. Antolín has a PhD in Economics from the University of Oxford.

Recent Trends in Morality and the Impact on Entitlements

Recent Trends in Morality and the Impact on Entitlements
with Stephen Goss
Wednesday, July 20
Noon to 1:00pm

Cato Institute
1000 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC 20001

Steve Goss has been Chief Actuary at the Social Security Administration since 2001.  Mr. Goss joined the Office of the Chief Actuary in 1973 after graduating from the University of Virginia with a MA in Mathematics.  He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1971 with a BA, majoring in mathematics and economics. Mr. Goss is a member of the Society of Actuaries, the American Academy of Actuaries, the National Academy of Social Insurance, the Social Insurance Committee of the American Academy of Actuaries, and the Social Security Retirement and Disability Income Committee of the Society of Actuaries.

Reaching Across Boarders: The Use of Global Savings Accounts to Enhance Retirement Security Worldwide

Reaching Across Boarders: The Use of Global Savings Accounts to Enhance Retirement Security Worldwide
with Kathryn Reilly
Thursday, June 9
Noon to 1:00pm

Investment Company Institute
1401 H St., NW, Suite 1100
Washington, DC 20005

Kathryn Reilly is the Global Director, Public Affairs for Aon. She leads the policy efforts for Aon’s business units and shapes proposals for such areas as healthcare, retirement, terrorism risk insurance, and financial services. Prior to joining Aon she worked for Caterpillar Inc. Kathryn has a B.A. from Eastern Illinois University and a M.B.A. from Georgetown University.

How Automatic IRAs Can Help Americans Reach Their Retirement Goals

Tuesday, May 24
8:30am –  10:00am
 

Urban Institute
2100 M Street NW, 6th Floor
Washington, DC

Robert Pozen is a nonresident senior fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution and a senior lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School of Management.  He has written on a wide variety of topics related to retirement saving.

The Pension Mis-Selling Scandal, the SEC, and the Enforcement of the Fiduciary Standard

Guest speaker Pension Policy Center Director John Turner

He will be discussing his new paper:

“The Pension Mis-Selling Scandal, the SEC, and the Enforcement of the Fiduciary Standard”

Wednesday, May 4
Noon – 1pm

Time Warner Cable
901 F Street, NW, Suite # 800
Washington, DC 20004

John A. Turner is Director of the Pension Policy Center, which provides research and consulting on social security, pension policy, and retirement planning.  Previously, he worked in the AARP Public Policy Institute, the International Labor Office in Geneva, Switzerland, and in research offices at the U.S. Social Security Administration and the U.S. Labor Department.

How America Supports Retirement: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Who Benefits

Guest speaker Peter Brady

He will be discussing his new book:

“How America Supports Retirement: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Who Benefits”

Thursday, March 10, 2016
Noon – 1pm

The Tax Foundation
1325 G Street, NW
Suite 950
Washington, DC 20005

Abstract
Assuring retirement security is a challenge for American workers, for their employers—and for the country’s policymakers. Government policy supports retirement preparedness primarily through two mechanisms: Social Security, which is a mandatory contributory pension for all workers, and tax deferral, which provides incentives for employers to offer and workers to participate in voluntary retirement plans.  Yet the combined effect of these two mechanisms is poorly understood—and subject to widespread myths.

In a new book, How America Supports Retirement: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Who Benefits, economist Peter Brady of the Investment Company Institute challenges the notion of an “upside-down” retirement system that only benefits the wealthy.

Brady’s innovative work is the first to use a consistent metric—a tax expenditure estimate—to measure the benefits of both tax deferral and Social Security. It illustrates that higher earners benefit more from tax deferral not because of their higher tax rates, but because the design of Social Security creates a strong incentive for them to defer more of their compensation.

In findings that bear directly upon today’s pressing policy debates, Brady demonstrates that the full system of government support for retirement is indeed progressive and warns that tax proposals to limit or fundamentally change tax deferral would actually make the code less fair.